Slow boat from Germany – delivering Adelaide’s trams

A long time ago I wrote about Adelaide’s Flexity trams and their Germany connection – well this is the story of how they got to Australia.

Flexity #110 heads north on Port Road at the Adelaide Gaol

The trams were built at the Bombardier factory in Bautzen, Germany.


Government of South Australia / DTEI photo

Tram bodies united with cabs.


Government of South Australia / DTEI photo

Tested in the sheds.


Government of South Australia / DTEI photo

And out into the snow.


Government of South Australia / DTEI photo

Then were then driven across Germany to the port city of Hamburg.


Government of South Australia / DTEI photo

And loaded onto a ro-ro cargo ship for the voyage to Australia.

The trams were then unloaded at Appleton Dock in Melbourne.


Government of South Australia / DTEI photo

Placed onto a low loader for the road journey west to Adelaide.

Flexity 113 on a low loader at Melbourne's Appleton Dock, awaiting the trip west to Adelaide

And then finally unloaded at the Adelaide Entertainment Centre.


Government of South Australia / DTEI photo

Footnote: air conditioning

Adelaide’s trams mightn’t been tested in the snow, but they couldn’t handle an Australian summer – so $4.25 million was spent in 2009 to retrofit the initial 11 trams with upgraded air conditioning systems better suited to local conditions.

Footnote: some nitpicking

Some of Adelaide’s Flexity trams were delivered directly by sea to Adelaide’s Outer Harbour instead of via Melbourne, and early deliveries were placed on the track at the terminus of the time, Victoria Square.

Further reading

Liked it? Take a second to support Marcus Wong on Patreon!
This entry was posted in Trams and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.